Kate-Lynne Wolmarans28 May 2018 AT 04:12 PM

Amazon is reportedly banning customers who return items too often

Oh no.
Kate-Lynne Wolmarans28 May 2018 AT 04:12 PM
Amazon is reportedly banning customers who return items too often
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Shopping online is great, isn’t it? No queues. No sales assistant hovering over you, offering help the second you walk in to the door only to disappear the second you need them. It is, well and truly great.

What’s not always so great is buying clothes online.

There’s the “size” argument. You know, the one where you convince yourself that your UK size 12 may be different to theirs. In some cases this is true as despite scanning the size chart and measuring yourself up to seven times, the trousers that end up arriving are usually not a size 12 and more of a size 8, which often leads you to feeling guilty about the brownie you ate in 2008.

There’s the “it looked better on the model” argument. Unlike the “size” argument the pants fit great, they just don’t suit you. At all.

And then there’s the “this is not what I ordered” argument. Where that plain, pale blue button up shirt you bought is actually dark blue with embroidery on it. You soon find that a) you didn’t read the description or b) you didn’t read the description or didn’t use the website’s zoom image feature. Fun times.

If you’re one the people who regularly falls victim to one or all three of the above arguments and, as a result end up constantly returning your items, you might not want to order clothes from Amazon.com anymore.

According to a report by The Wall Street Journal, several customers have found themselves banned after repeatedly returning items.

The claims, as you would have guessed, have caused a bit an issue. Not just because Amazon prides itself on being a customer friendly company but because the e-commerce platform has not specified how many returns are “too many”.

A look at the company’s “Return Policy” isn’t too helpful either as although it does not explicitly state that excessive returns could lead to potentially being banned, it does say in its conditions of use that “it reserves the right to terminate accounts in its sole discretion.”

We’ve asked the folks at Amazon for a comment.

We’ll keep you posted, should we get one.

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