Team shortlist25 Sep 2017 AT 01:51 PM

Oxford dictionary just added some very modern new words

How many do you understand?
Team shortlist25 Sep 2017 AT 01:51 PM
Oxford dictionary just added some very modern new words
© Shutterstock

The Oxford dictionary has announced that some very modern, very dad-bothering words are to be added to the OxfordDictionary website.

Among them are ‘dab’ (that dance Paul Pogba used to do) and ‘screen grab’ (that thing you do every time someone in work sends you a sorta iffy message and you think you may have to blackmail them one day), as well as ‘cheat day’ (for when you skip the gym/being healthy so you can go be a normal human instead), ‘Generation Z’ (aka children who dab and love fidget spinners), and, uh, ‘fidget spinner’ (you know).

Fair enough so far, right? All words and phrases regularly used by the populous at large. But if you delve deeper, a few oddities start to rear their locutive heads: things like ‘snollygosters’, for instance, which is apparently a 19th century term referring to a shrewd, unprincipled person.

Still, there’s nothing lamer than moaning about the elastic nature of words and half the words we use all the time now didn’t exist a decade or two ago so updates like this - while risible, while annoying, while sometimes downright soul-destroying - are just another part of the game…

Other words added to OxfordDictionaries.com include…

Breviloquent (adjective)
Using very few words; concise.

Bug bounty (noun)
A reward offered to a person who identifies an error or vulnerability in a computer program or system.

Civic nationalism (noun)
A political attitude of devotion to and vigorous support for one’s country combined with a feeling of shared community with fellow citizens, especially as contrasted with a similar attitude based on ethnicity, race, or religion.

Clicktivist (noun)
A person who shows supports for a political or social cause via the Internet by means such as social media or online petitions, typically in a way characterized as involving little effort or commitment.

Hicksville (noun)
A place regarded as provincial and unsophisticated.

Non-denial (noun)
A statement that appears to deny that something is true but does not in fact constitute a rebuttal of the specific claim or accusation.

Popcorn movie (noun)
A film that is perceived as entertaining but lacking in depth or artistic merit.

Puggle (noun)
A dog that is a crossbreed of a pug and a beagle: he’s a puggle, a beagle and pug mix, sporting a permanently frowny face.

Robo-adviser (noun)
An online application that provides automated financial guidance and services.

Self-care (noun)
The practice of taking action to preserve or improve one’s own health.

Silent Generation (noun)
The generation of people born before that of the baby boomers (roughly from the mid 1920s to the mid 1940s), perceived to tend towards conformism or restraint in their outlook and behaviour.

State-building (noun)
The activity of building or strengthening the institutions and infrastructure of a weak or failing state, typically by a foreign power.

Surge pricing (noun)
The practice of charging more for a product or service during periods when it is in high demand.

Sweetheart deal (noun)
An arrangement or agreement reached privately by two sides in an unofficial or illicit way.

Triple threat (noun)
A person, especially a performer or athlete, who is proficient in three important skills within their particular field. 

You might like

Costa completes first drone delivery on Dubai's Kite Beach

Comments